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History: Home UK Divorce Forum
Topic:
Post Absolute Advice Please (2 Posts)
Started By:
Date:
19 September, 2017 08:37AM
Post Absolute Advice Please
oldenoughtoknowbetter - 19 September, 2017 08:37AM
I have just received my absolute papers through and would like clarification on a couple of points. There are two notes attached (1) Divorce inheritance under a will – by virtue of section 18a of Wills act a&b

(2) Divorce affects the appointment of a guardian. (Both children are +18yrs)


Also we haven’t not yet agreed an financial settlement, family home is on market and not yet sold, there are some joint debt and pensions to split and no savings. What happens in the interim period until this is resolved now that we are not legally married. I want to get on and buy my own house, continue with pension funds and start saving. Will any of this have to be included in financial settlement if post-divorce date?

Many thanks
Re: Post Absolute Advice Please
davidterry - 21 September, 2017 10:07AM
You would be wise to sort out the financial issues arising from the marriage formally and finally before you buy another property or build up any other significant assets. If you do not do this you run the risk that your ex may make financial claims against you perhaps many years from now.

The case of Wyatt v Vince may prove instructive if you doubt this advice [www.familylawweek.co.uk]
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